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Books with title The Honey Makers

  • The Honey Makers

    Gail Gibbons

    Paperback (Collins, April 5, 2000)
    Get the buzz on bees in this classic nonfiction picture book by Washington Post/Children’s Book Guild Award winner Gail Gibbons!Ever wondered how a jar of honey is made? Thousands of bees visit more than one million flowers to gather the nectar that goes into a one-pound jar of honey. Every page in this picture book reveals how these remarkable insects work together to create this amazing food.With detailed illustrations and diagrams, Gail Gibbons offers a classroom-ready nonfiction picture book that makes complex scientific concepts understandable and entertaining for young readers.
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  • The honey-makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    language (, June 23, 2013)
    The honey-makers. 436 Pages.
  • The Honey Makers

    Gail Gibbons

    Hardcover (William Morrow & Co, March 1, 1997)
    Covers the physical structure of honeybees and how they live in colonies, as well as how they produce honey and are managed by beekeepers.
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  • The Honey-Makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    language (Home Farm Books, Sept. 15, 2017)
    "The Honey-Makers" a detailed guide to the honey bee, with chapters on anatomy, habits and habitat, hive structure, history, literary references, and more. A fascinating and informative book, "The Honey-Makers" is highly recommended for bee-keepers and others with an interest in bees. Contents include: "Structure, Habits, and Products of the Honey-Bee", "The Bee's Tongue", "Eyes, Antennae, and Brain", "The Wings", "The Legs", "Honey-Sac and Wax-Pockets", "The Sting", "The Family", "The Drone", "The Worker", "The Swarm", "Honey", "Mead", "The Literature and History of the Bee", "In Hindu Literature", etc. Other works by this author include "A Song of Life", "Life and Love", and "The Bee People". Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on Bee-keeping. First published in 1899.
  • Honey Makers

    Gail Gibbons

    Library Binding (Perfection Learning, April 5, 2000)
    How sweet it is. Thousands of bees visited more than one million flowers to gather the nectar that went into that one-pound jar of honey. Here's the buzz on how these remarkable insects work together to create this amazing food.
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  • The Honey-Makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    Paperback (Home Farm Books, Oct. 31, 2016)
    “The Honey-Makers” a detailed guide to the honey bee, with chapters on anatomy, habits and habitat, hive structure, history, literary references, and more. A fascinating and informative book, “The Honey-Makers” is highly recommended for bee-keepers and others with an interest in bees. Contents include: “Structure, Habits, and Products of the Honey-Bee”, “The Bee's Tongue”, “Eyes, Antennae, and Brain”, “The Wings”, “The Legs”, “Honey-Sac and Wax-Pockets”, “The Sting”, “The Family”, “The Drone”, “The Worker”, “The Swarm”, “Honey”, “Mead”, “The Literature and History of the Bee”, “In Hindu Literature”, etc. Other works by this author include “A Song of Life”, “Life and Love”, and “The Bee People”. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on Bee-keeping. First published in 1899.
  • The Honey-Makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    language (, May 14, 2010)
    This volume was published in 1899. Contents: PART I: I. Structure, Habits and Products of the Honey-Bee II. The Bee's Tongue III. Eyes, Antenna and Brain IV. The Wings V. The Legs VI. Honey-Sac and Wax-Pockets VII. The Sting VIII. The Family IX. The Drone X. The Worker XI. The Swarm XII. Honey XIII. Mead Part II: The Literature and History of the Bee XIV. In Hindu Literature XV. In Egypt and the East XVI. In Greece and Italy XVII. In Greece and Italy (continued) XVIII. In Christian and Medieval Times XIX. Curious Customs and Beliefs in Modern Times XX. Bee Culture at Present .............................................................................. Some excerpts from the book: It is amusing to watch a bee on a cluster of flowers new to it. Its " unerring instinct " does not lead it at once to the best manner of securing the nectar; like the rest of us, it has to live and learn by experiment and gain knowledge through failure. There is one flower concerning which a honey-bee never seems ignorant, however. Present the captive with white clover-heads, and it instantly goes to work, putting the proboscis, or tongue, as we shall now call it, since we are done with scientific terms for the present, into flower after flower, always in the right place. But with other flowers it is less certain. ............................................................................... To fertilize the flowers has always been the office of the bee, as we can see now that the processes of nature are understood. But it cannot so easily be believed that the bee once gave the world the only "sugar" it had, — that is, the only material for sweetening ; yet it is but a few centuries since sugar came into use in Europe. The first cane-sugar known in our records came from China, that wonderful secret country which has given us so many of our useful arts. Its course was thence to India and Arabia, and between China and these countries it appears to have been for centuries an article of trade. ............................................................................... It was a common superstition among the northern and western peoples that a child upon whom a bee settled in sleep was a child of good fortune — a lucky child. In Finnish mythology there is an invocation to the bee, imploring it to fly far away over the moon, over the sun, near to the axis of the constellation of The Wagon, into the dwelling of the creator, God, and bring back upon its wings and in its mouth health and honey to the good, and wounds of fire and iron to the wicked. There is a Circassian legend to the effect that divine intervention was once used to preserve the race of bees from destruction. Merime, the mother of the gods, could not protect the bees when Indras, the god of thunder, was angry with them, and they all perished but one which the goddess concealed beneath her inmost garment, and from which proceeded anew the race of bees.
  • The Honey-Makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    Hardcover (Sagwan Press, Aug. 22, 2015)
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • The Honey-makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    Hardcover (Palala Press, Nov. 19, 2015)
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • The Honey Makers

    Gail Gibbons

    Library Binding (William Morrow & Co, March 1, 1997)
    Full-color illustrations and a fact-filled text capture the life cycle of honeybees, detailing three types of the bees, their special tasks, the important role of bees in nature, and their creation of honey.
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  • The Honey-makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    Hardcover (Palala Press, Dec. 7, 2015)
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
  • The Honey-Makers

    Margaret Warner Morley

    Paperback (Forgotten Books, Jan. 24, 2019)
    Excerpt from The Honey-MakersThis sugar, we are told, was in consistence like salt, being, like it, brittle between the teeth.Sugar came to be a synonym for everything that had a sweet taste, hence the acetate of lead is called sugar of lead.It was not until about the seventeenth century that sugar became an article Of common use in Europe. Up to that time it was used chiefly as a medicine, or by the rich as a delicacy at feasts upon very special occasions.At the present time sugar has superseded honey as an article of every-day use. Honey has lost most of its im portance in the family life but not so the bee, for we now know that it does inestimable service in perfecting the fruits Of the earth, and that without it our orchards would be lean and our gardens barren.This knowledge makes a scientific study of the bee as fascinating as is the story of honey and its maker in rela tion to the individual life of the races of men that have preceded us.Since the bee existed before literature and history, the true sequence in treating it is, first, its structure and habits, and then its place in song and homily.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.