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Books with title The Colosseum

  • Where Is the Colosseum?

    Jim O'Connor, Who HQ, John O'Brien

    Paperback (Penguin Workshop, Jan. 24, 2017)
    A marvel of engineering that proclaimed the might of the Emperor of Ancient Rome.The Emperor Titus opened the enormous Colosseum in AD 80 to host 100 days of games, and it will astound readers to learn what the ancient Romans found entertaining. Over 50,000 screaming fans watched gladiators battling each other to the death, men fighting exotic wild beasts, and even mock sea battles with warships floating on an arena floor flooded with water. By AD 476 the Roman Empire had fallen, and yet the ruins of the Colosseum remain a world-famous landmark of an unforgettable time.
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  • Where Is the Colosseum?

    Jim O'Connor, Who HQ, John O'Brien

    eBook (Penguin Workshop, Jan. 24, 2017)
    A marvel of engineering that proclaimed the might of the Emperor of Ancient Rome.The Emperor Titus opened the enormous Colosseum in AD 80 to host 100 days of games, and it will astound readers to learn what the ancient Romans found entertaining. Over 50,000 screaming fans watched gladiators battling each other to the death, men fighting exotic wild beasts, and even mock sea battles with warships floating on an arena floor flooded with water. By AD 476 the Roman Empire had fallen, and yet the ruins of the Colosseum remain a world-famous landmark of an unforgettable time.
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  • The Colossus

    Plath Sylvia

    language (, Feb. 16, 2020)
    Prominent journalist, poet and literary critic for The Observer newspaper, Al Alvarez, called the posthumous re-release of the book, after the success of Ariel, a "major literary event" and wrote of Plath's work:"She steers clear of feminine charm, deliciousness, gentility, supersensitivity and the act of being a poetess. She simply writes good poetry. And she does so with a seriousness that demands only that she be judged equally seriously... There is an admirable no-nonsense air about this; the language is bare but vivid and precise, with a concentration that implies a good deal of disturbance with proportionately little fuss."Seamus Heaney said of The Colossus: "On every page, a poet is serving notice that she has earned her credentials and knows her trade."
  • The Colossus

    Plath Sylvia

    language (, June 15, 2020)
    Prominent journalist, poet and literary critic for The Observer newspaper, Al Alvarez, called the posthumous re-release of the book, after the success of Ariel, a "major literary event" and wrote of Plath's work:"She steers clear of feminine charm, deliciousness, gentility, supersensitivity and the act of being a poetess. She simply writes good poetry. And she does so with a seriousness that demands only that she be judged equally seriously... There is an admirable no-nonsense air about this; the language is bare but vivid and precise, with a concentration that implies a good deal of disturbance with proportionately little fuss."Seamus Heaney said of The Colossus: "On every page, a poet is serving notice that she has earned her credentials and knows her trade."
  • The Colosseum

    Lesley A. Dutemple

    Library Binding (Lerner Pub Group, April 1, 2003)
    Describes the history of the construction, in Rome, Italy, of the Colosseum, considered by many to be the most famous building in the world.
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  • The Colosseum

    Peter Chrisp

    Hardcover (Hodder Wayland, )
    None
  • The Roman Colosseum

    Fiona MacDonald, Mark Bergin

    eBook (The Salariya Book Company, Jan. 4, 2016)
    Step inside the Colosseum at Rome around AD80 and discover for yourself the technological wonders, the vicious weapons, the thrills and the dangers of a great Roman arena. Find out why this incredible feat of architecture was built, who paid for it and where the money came from. And then gasp at the stars: the Gladiators who fought for their lives in the ancient Roman Colosseum and made it so lucrative for those in charge of this ruthless business. Astounding architectural achievements are explained and explored with full-colour cutaway illustrations. Pinpoint enlargements focus on the day to day lives of the people, looking at how they ate, dressed, entertained themselves and sometimes fought. Illustrations of artefacts and paintings from the era help to support the main text by providing explanations of how we know what we know. Informative captions, maps, a complete glossary and an index make these titles ideal educational texts.
  • The Roman Colosseum

    Fiona Macdonald, Mark Bergin

    Flexibound (Scribo, March 17, 2015)
    Inside the enormous, boldly designed Roman Colosseum, gladiators fought for their lives as citizens watched the deadly "entertainment." Completed in 96 AD, it's a miraculous feat of engineering. This noble monument, and the ancient empire that created it, await young readers on these stunningly illustrated pages. Curious children can discover why and how the Colosseum was built; how it was decorated; who was allowed to enter; what took place behind the scenes; and what the Roman world was like. Full-color cutaways reveal the details of this astounding architectural achievement, and pinpoint enlargements focus on the day-to-day life of the people—including how they ate, dressed, and sometimes fought.
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  • The Colossus

    Sylvia Plath

    language (, April 17, 2020)
    Prominent journalist, poet and literary critic for The Observer newspaper, Al Alvarez, called the posthumous re-release of the book, after the success of Ariel, a "major literary event" and wrote of Plath's work:"She steers clear of feminine charm, deliciousness, gentility, supersensitivity and the act of being a poetess. She simply writes good poetry. And she does so with a seriousness that demands only that she be judged equally seriously... There is an admirable no-nonsense air about this; the language is bare but vivid and precise, with a concentration that implies a good deal of disturbance with proportionately little fuss."Seamus Heaney said of The Colossus: "On every page, a poet is serving notice that she has earned her credentials and knows her trade."
  • The Colosseum

    Peter Chrisp

    School & Library Binding (Raintree, March 15, 1816)
    None
  • The Colosseum

    Peter Chrisp

    Library Binding (Heinemann/Raintree, Sept. 1, 1997)
    Describes the planning and building of the Colosseum in ancient Rome, and tells how it was used.
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  • The Colossus

    Plath Sylvia

    language (, Feb. 29, 2020)
    Prominent journalist, poet and literary critic for The Observer newspaper, Al Alvarez, called the posthumous re-release of the book, after the success of Ariel, a "major literary event" and wrote of Plath's work:"She steers clear of feminine charm, deliciousness, gentility, supersensitivity and the act of being a poetess. She simply writes good poetry. And she does so with a seriousness that demands only that she be judged equally seriously... There is an admirable no-nonsense air about this; the language is bare but vivid and precise, with a concentration that implies a good deal of disturbance with proportionately little fuss."Seamus Heaney said of The Colossus: "On every page, a poet is serving notice that she has earned her credentials and knows her trade.