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Books with title The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A BabyLit�� Camping Primer

  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    language (The Classics, June 11, 2020)
    Mark Twain’s tale of a boy’s picaresque journey down the Mississippi on a raft conveyed the voice and experience of the American frontier as no other work has done before. When Huck escapes from his drunken father and the ‘sivilizing’ Widow Douglas with the runaway slave Jim, he embarks on a series of adventures that draw him to feuding families and the trickery of the unscrupulous ‘Duke’ and ‘Daupin’. Beneath the exploits, however, are more serious undercurrents — of slavery, adult control and, above all, of Huck’s struggle between his instinctive goodness and the corrupt values of society, which threaten his deep and enduring frienship with Jim.All modern American literature comes from… “Huckleberry Finn”. It’s the best book we’ve had. —Ernest HemingwayProbably the most stupendous event of my whole life. —Henry Louis Mencken[Huck is] one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction, not unworthy to take a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet… —T. S. EliotThe mark of how good ‘Huckleberry Finn’ has to be is that one can compare it to a number of our best modern American novels and it stands up page for page, awkward here, sensational there — absolutely the equal of one of those rare incredible first novels that come along once or twice in a decade. —Norman MailerThe first truly American writer, and all of us since are his heirs. —William Faulkner
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    language (Clydesdale, May 17, 2016)
    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential literary works. The series features literary phenomena with influence and themes so great that, after their publication, they changed literature forever. From the musings of literary geniuses such as Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter, to the striking personal narratives from Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our history through the words of an exceptional few.Ernest Hemingway once said: “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.” Often referred to as “the great American novel,” The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn defined American literature with its richness of characters, colorful vernacular, and vibrant depictions of the American Midwest. Told in the first-person from the viewpoint of the classic protagonist, the satirical narrative follows young “Huck” Finn as he searches for escape and adventure along the Mississippi River.The story begins where Twain’s previous novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, left off: Huck and his friend Tom Sawyer come into a large sum of money, and Huck is adopted by a middle-class widow who attempts to civilize him. Accustomed to a poor, destitute existence and vagabonding with his abusive alcoholic father, Huck quickly becomes dissatisfied with the confines and rigidity of his new life. When his father returns and begins to harass him for money, Huck is kidnapped and taken to his father’s cabin, where he longs to escape. After faking his own death, Huck escapes to Jackson’s Island where he meets a slave named Jim, who is also running away. Together, they travel on a raft up the Mississippi River in search of freedom.An absolute, uncontested classic, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the greatest coming-of-age adventure tales of our time.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    language (Clydesdale, May 17, 2016)
    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential literary works. The series features literary phenomena with influence and themes so great that, after their publication, they changed literature forever. From the musings of literary geniuses such as Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter, to the striking personal narratives from Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our history through the words of an exceptional few.Ernest Hemingway once said: “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.” Often referred to as “the great American novel,” The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn defined American literature with its richness of characters, colorful vernacular, and vibrant depictions of the American Midwest. Told in the first-person from the viewpoint of the classic protagonist, the satirical narrative follows young “Huck” Finn as he searches for escape and adventure along the Mississippi River.The story begins where Twain’s previous novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, left off: Huck and his friend Tom Sawyer come into a large sum of money, and Huck is adopted by a middle-class widow who attempts to civilize him. Accustomed to a poor, destitute existence and vagabonding with his abusive alcoholic father, Huck quickly becomes dissatisfied with the confines and rigidity of his new life. When his father returns and begins to harass him for money, Huck is kidnapped and taken to his father’s cabin, where he longs to escape. After faking his own death, Huck escapes to Jackson’s Island where he meets a slave named Jim, who is also running away. Together, they travel on a raft up the Mississippi River in search of freedom.An absolute, uncontested classic, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the greatest coming-of-age adventure tales of our time.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    eBook (Clydesdale, May 17, 2016)
    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential literary works. The series features literary phenomena with influence and themes so great that, after their publication, they changed literature forever. From the musings of literary geniuses such as Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter, to the striking personal narratives from Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our history through the words of an exceptional few.Ernest Hemingway once said: “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.” Often referred to as “the great American novel,” The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn defined American literature with its richness of characters, colorful vernacular, and vibrant depictions of the American Midwest. Told in the first-person from the viewpoint of the classic protagonist, the satirical narrative follows young “Huck” Finn as he searches for escape and adventure along the Mississippi River.The story begins where Twain’s previous novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, left off: Huck and his friend Tom Sawyer come into a large sum of money, and Huck is adopted by a middle-class widow who attempts to civilize him. Accustomed to a poor, destitute existence and vagabonding with his abusive alcoholic father, Huck quickly becomes dissatisfied with the confines and rigidity of his new life. When his father returns and begins to harass him for money, Huck is kidnapped and taken to his father’s cabin, where he longs to escape. After faking his own death, Huck escapes to Jackson’s Island where he meets a slave named Jim, who is also running away. Together, they travel on a raft up the Mississippi River in search of freedom.An absolute, uncontested classic, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the greatest coming-of-age adventure tales of our time.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    eBook (Clydesdale, May 17, 2016)
    Packaged in handsome, affordable trade editions, Clydesdale Classics is a new series of essential literary works. The series features literary phenomena with influence and themes so great that, after their publication, they changed literature forever. From the musings of literary geniuses such as Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter, to the striking personal narratives from Harriet Jacobs in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, this new series is a comprehensive collection of our history through the words of an exceptional few.Ernest Hemingway once said: “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.” Often referred to as “the great American novel,” The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn defined American literature with its richness of characters, colorful vernacular, and vibrant depictions of the American Midwest. Told in the first-person from the viewpoint of the classic protagonist, the satirical narrative follows young “Huck” Finn as he searches for escape and adventure along the Mississippi River.The story begins where Twain’s previous novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, left off: Huck and his friend Tom Sawyer come into a large sum of money, and Huck is adopted by a middle-class widow who attempts to civilize him. Accustomed to a poor, destitute existence and vagabonding with his abusive alcoholic father, Huck quickly becomes dissatisfied with the confines and rigidity of his new life. When his father returns and begins to harass him for money, Huck is kidnapped and taken to his father’s cabin, where he longs to escape. After faking his own death, Huck escapes to Jackson’s Island where he meets a slave named Jim, who is also running away. Together, they travel on a raft up the Mississippi River in search of freedom.An absolute, uncontested classic, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the greatest coming-of-age adventure tales of our time.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    eBook (AmazonClassics, June 13, 2017)
    Refusing to be civilized by Southern society or cowed by his drunken father’s lashings, young Huckleberry Finn decides he has only one option left: fake his own death and hop a raft down the Mississippi River. Instead of carrying him far from trouble, though, Huck’s raft delivers him to a place of moral uncertainty.Mark Twain unwinds Huck’s harrowing journey to manhood with satirical wit, revealing the troubled history of the American South, where slavery held sway long after the Civil War ended. Huck’s relationship with runaway slave Jim forces him to confront his beliefs about friendship and freedom.AmazonClassics brings you timeless works from the masters of storytelling. Ideal for anyone who wants to read a great work for the first time or rediscover an old favorite, these new editions open the door to literature’s most unforgettable characters and beloved worlds.Revised edition: Previously published as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, this edition of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (AmazonClassics Edition) includes editorial revisions.
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  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A BabyLit® Camping Primer

    Jennifer Adams, Alison Oliver

    Board book (Gibbs Smith, March 1, 2014)
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A BabyLit® Camping Primer Take a trip downriver in Huckleberry Finn: A BabyLit Camping Primer. Alison Oliver’s crisp illustrations help little ones learn camping vocabulary such as “raft,” “river,” and “fishing line” while Jennifer Adam’s carefully curated quotations from the original text will have parents reading with the soft, twangy accent of Mark Twain.
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  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain, Sam Ryan, MustRead

    Audible Audiobook (MustRead, March 28, 2019)
    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, a friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain, Classics Nyengatu

    Paperback (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, April 15, 2018)
    Unabridged, large size (8.5x11 inches, 21.59 x 27.94 cm) print on cream paper with small (10-point) type and three column format.First published in 1884, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is among the first novels in American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English. Some have called it the first Great American Novel, and the book has become required reading in many schools throughout the United States.The story is set along the Mississippi River in Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky and Arkansas around 1840. It depicts the development of Huckleberry (Huck) Finn, a boy about thirteen years old. Huck has to find a way between his belief in the right thing to do and what most do believe to be wrong.All modern American literature comes from Huck Finn—Hemingway
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  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain, Worth Brehm, E. W. Kemble

    Paperback (SeaWolf Press, Jan. 3, 2019)
    Unabridged and Uncensored. A beautiful version with a beautiful Worth Brehm cover and all 174 original illustrations and text from the first edition.Don't be fooled by other versions with missing or made-up pictures. Mark Twain created the memorable characters Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn drawing from the experiences of boys he grew up with in Missouri. Set by the Mississippi River in the 1840’s, this tale is a follow-up to his original book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Huckleberry takes off on a raft down the Mississippi with Jim, a slave seeking his freedom. They run into two con artists, the Duke and the King, as they drift southward, and Huck reunites with Tom Sawyer near the end of the book. The book exposes attitudes prevalent at the times, especially racism, and includes coarse language.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain

    Reprint Edition (Bantam Classics, March 1, 1981)
    Hilariously picaresque, epic in scope, alive with the poetry and vigor of the American people, Mark Twain's story about a young boy and his journey down the Mississippi was the first great novel to speak in a truly American voice. Influencing subsequent generations of writers -- from Sherwood Anderson to Twain's fellow Missourian, T.S. Eliot, from Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner to J.D. Salinger -- Huckleberry Finn, like the river which flows through its pages, is one of the great sources which nourished and still nourishes the literature of America.
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  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Mark Twain, Oliver Ho, Dan Andreasen, Arthur Pober Ed.D

    Hardcover (Sterling Children's Books, March 28, 2006)
    “We said there was no home like a raft. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery…but you feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.” Sail down the Mississippi with Huck Finn and the runaway slave, Jim. Twain’s beloved tale, with its folksy language, creates an indelible image of antebellum America with its sleepy river towns, con men, family feuds, and a variety of colorful characters.
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