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Books with title Prairie-Town Boy

  • Prairie-Town Boy

    Carl Sandburg, Joe Krush

    Paperback (HMH Books for Young Readers, Aug. 24, 1990)
    Always the Young Strangers, the author’s recollections of his childhood and youth in Galesburg, Illinois, is presented in a shortened version for younger readers.
    U
  • Prairie Town

    Bonnie Geisert, Arthur Geisert

    Hardcover (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, )
    None
    K
  • Prairie Boy

    Barb Roenstock, Christopher Silas Neal

    eBook (Calkins Creek, June 9, 2020)
    A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People * A NSTA/CBC Best STEM BookFrank Lloyd Wright, a young boy from the prairie, becomes America's first world-famous architect in this inspirational nonfiction picture book introducing organic architecture -- a style he created based on the relationship between buildings and the natural world -- which transformed the American home.Frank Lloyd Wright loved the Wisconsin prairie where he was born, with its wide-open sky and waves of tall grass. As his family moved across the United States, young Frank found his own home in shapes: rectangles, triangles, half-moons, and circles. When he returned to his beloved prairie, Frank pursued a career in architecture. But he didn't think the Victorian-era homes found there fit the prairie landscape. Using his knowledge and love of shapes, Frank created houses more organic to the land. He redesigned the American home inside and out, developing a truly unique architecture style that celebrated the country's landscape and lifestyle. Author Barb Rosenstock and artist Christopher Silas Neal explore the early life and creative genius of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, highlighting his passion, imagination, and ingenuity.
  • Prairie Town Boy

    Carl Sandburg

    Hardcover (Palala Press, Aug. 31, 2015)
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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  • Prairie Dog Town

    Janette Oke

    Paperback (Bethany House, June 1, 2001)
    Flick, a curious young prairie dog, learns about the pleasures and dangers of life outside his family's underground home, as well as the importance of obeying his parents.
    K
  • Prairie-Town Boy

    Carl Sandburg

    Hardcover (Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., Jan. 1, 1955)
    Always the Young Strangers, the author’s recollections of his childhood and youth in Galesburg, Illinois, is presented in a shortened version for younger readers.
  • A Prairie Boy

    William Roy Brownridge, David Brownridge, Gary Sweitzer

    Hardcover (William Roy Brownridge, Oct. 31, 2019)
    Author/ illustrator of the best-selling children’s book trilogy ‘The Moccasin Goalie’, Bill Brownridge has a new picture book: ‘A Prairie Boy’.With a story that opens your eyes, and artwork that opens the rest of your senses, Brownridge reveals a new world to kids with his thick ‘pointillism’ paintings presented in wow-ly colorful double-page spreads.For Tony LaDrew, living on the farm with his grandparents is a lonely life. He only has his pony Trix and his dog Bingo for company. And as a Metis boy, it isn’t easy making friends. But playing hockey makes all the difference to Tony - whether on a slough, on a road, or on a rink – he loves the action. Swooping down the ice is like flying, like another world.Too bad his grandfather doesn’t like hockey. On top of that, there’s a local tough guy giving him problems. At every turn, Tony seems to face another challenge. And now, with his big chance to join the team coming up, he has to take drastic action. * * *Brownridge opens a new dimension to kids with his impressionist paintings of kids at play. His application of dabs and dollops of ‘fat’ acrylic paint in the Van-Gogh technique of pointillism accentuate tone and dimension, the vivid swathes of colour and diagonals exclaim action, while the moody blends heighten the wideness of the world and us in it. As the books says, it’s like another world. And the door’s open. Take a step.Imagine reading a picture book together. You and your boy and girl look at the pictures together, take turns reading the words, compare words to pictures, talk about the people and the story. And then you talk about the ‘art’. But is it art or just funny drawings and amateur scribblings - it’s hard to tell.For once it’s nice to have the real deal. Real fine art. With Brownridge, a renowned Canadian artist with galleries across the country, with his introduction of fine art into the picture book, he opens the door to talk about colour and texture, light and shadow, style and theme, feelings and fears and awe and wonder – using kid’s language, of course, so they can understand.You see, that’s the learning part, your exchange – the talking. The book doesn’t teach. It’s you and her and him, you’re all teachers, all learners.Take a step.
    S
  • Prairie Town Boy

    Carl Sandburg

    Paperback (Ulan Press, Sept. 24, 2012)
    This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, strange characters and confusing formatting) and does not adequately preserve the historical character of the original artifact. We believe this work is culturally important in its original archival form. While we strive to adequately clean and digitally enhance the original work, there are occasionally instances where imperfections such as blurred or missing pages, poor pictures or errant marks may have been introduced due to either the quality of the original work or the scanning process itself. Despite these occasional imperfections, we have brought it back into print as part of our ongoing global book preservation commitment, providing customers with access to the best possible historical reprints. We appreciate your understanding of these occasional imperfections, and sincerely hope you enjoy seeing the book in a format as close as possible to that intended by the original publisher.
  • prairie town boy

    Carl Sandburg

    Hardcover (Harcourt Brace & World, Jan. 1, 1952)
    1952. HB. Solid, clean. Ex-library. glue marks on inside front & back. almost no shelf-wear on edges. 179 pg. DJ is laminated with small label on spine.
  • Prairie Dog Town

    Janette Oke, Brenda Mann

    Paperback (Bethany House Pub, Dec. 1, 1988)
    Flick the prairie dog learns many lessons as he ventures outside for the first time.
    P
  • A Prairie Boy

    William Roy Brownridge, David Brownridge

    eBook (William Roy Brownridge, Nov. 12, 2019)
    Author/ illustrator of the best-selling children’s book trilogy ‘The Moccasin Goalie’, Bill Brownridge has a new picture book: ‘A Prairie Boy’. With a story that opens your eyes, and artwork that opens the rest of your senses, Brownridge reveals a new world to kids with his thick ‘pointillism’ paintings presented in wow-ly colorful double-page spreads. For Tony LaDrew, living on the farm with his grandparents is a lonely life. He only has his pony Trix and his dog Bingo for company. And as a Metis boy, it isn’t easy making friends. But playing hockey makes all the difference to Tony - whether on a slough, on a road, or on a rink – he loves the action. Swooping down the ice is like flying, like another world. Too bad his grandfather doesn’t like hockey. On top of that, there’s a local tough guy giving him problems. At every turn, Tony seems to face another challenge. And now, with his big chance to join the team coming up, he has to take drastic action. * * * Brownridge opens a new dimension to kids with his impressionist paintings of kids at play. His application of dabs and dollops of ‘fat’ acrylic paint in the Van-Gogh technique of pointillism accentuate tone and dimension, the vivid swathes of colour and diagonals exclaim action, while the moody blends heighten the wideness of the world and us in it. As the books says, it’s like another world. And the door’s open. Take a step. Imagine reading a picture book together. You and your boy and girl look at the pictures together, take turns reading the words, compare words to pictures, talk about the people and the story. And then you talk about the ‘art’. But is it art or just funny drawings and amateur scribblings, it’s hard to tell. For once it’s nice to have the real deal. Real fine art. With Brownridge, a renowned Canadian artist with galleries across the country, with his introduction of fine art into the picture book, he opens the door to talk about color and texture, light and shadow, style and theme, feelings and fears and awe and wonder – using kid’s language, of course, so they can understand. You see, that’s the learning part, your exchange – the talking. The book doesn’t teach. It’s you and her, and him, you’re all teachers, all learners. Take a step. * * * 'The Moccasin Goalie', Brownridge’s first children’s book, was chosen to be used in the Northwest Territories Literacy Council Books in the Home Program, a literacy program sponsored by the Canadian Federal Government.“The combination of a warm, affirming story and fine illustration makes [Moccasin Goalie] a book for all collections serving young listeners and readers. Highly recommended.” (Dave Jenkinson 1995; Manitoba Library Association)"This book (Moccasin Goalie) is highly recommended both for its positive message and for its joyous celebration of youthful pastimes." "The pointillist technique used to depict ice and snow gives the pictures a scintillating, sparkling effect." (Canadian Children's Literature 1995-10-01)"Brownridge's full-colour paintings...powerfully capture both the biting cold of prairie winters and the eye-dazzling brightness of the season's days." "The combination of a warm, affirming story and fine illustration makes this a book for all collections serving young listeners and readers." (CM Magazine 1995-11-24)"Makes a nice read-aloud book as well as a read-by-myself book for early readers. It contains beautiful, big, full-color illustrations that add feeling to this emotional story." (Christian Library Journal 1996-09-01)
  • Prairie-Dog Town

    L. Frank Baum

    eBook (anboco, Sept. 1, 2016)
    The PicnicPrairie-Dog TownMr. Bowko, the MayorPresto Digi, the MagicianThe Home of the Puff-PudgysTeenty and WeentyThe Mayor Gives a LuncheonOn Top of the Earth Again