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Books with author Radha Nair

  • Maarthaanda Varma

    RADHA N. NAIR

    language (Amar Chitra Katha Pvt Ltd, April 1, 1971)
    The old Maharaja of Travancore grew frail and there was talk of who should succeed him. By matrilineal tradition his nephew, Maarthaanda Varma, was the heir. But councillors were plotting to break with custom and install the Maharaja's gullible son on the throne. The best way to get rid of Maarthaanda, they decided, was to kill him. The story of Maarthanda's escape and his coronation has been adapted from the novel Maarthaandavarma by CV Raman Pillai, one of the great Malayalam writers. In Maarthaandavarma, he writes a historical romance about an actual Maharaja of Travancore. Historically, Maarthaanda Varma is still remembered for uniting the kingdom of Travancore, and providing it with a just and strong government.
  • Kochunni

    RADHA M. NAIR

    language (Amar Chitra Katha Pvt Ltd, April 1, 1971)
    Kochunni ran away from home, to avoid living with his thieving parents. But wherever he went, people insisted on treating the little boy as a thief himself. Kochunni grew up deteremined to make his mark on the world and to fight injustice and prejudice. He became a highwayman, a daring Robin Hood-like figure who robbed the rich and gave the poor. He liked to target the most arrogant and cruel landlords and teach them a lesson. With his martial skills and his daring, Kochunni managed to outwit everyone. Kochunni's sense of mischief makes him the subject of many folk tales in Kerala.
  • Appu's Trunk

    Radha Nair

    Paperback (D, )
    None
  • Appu's Trunk

    Radha Nair

    eBook (DC BOOKS, )
    None
  • Velu Thampi

    Radha Nair

    (Amar Chitra Katha, Jan. 1, 2022)
    It was a time of corruption and despotism in the state of Travancore. Balarama Varma, the Maharaja, was a helpless teenager who watched his Diwan take advantage of his inexperience to impose crushing taxes on the people and pocket the money himself. It was Velu Thampi who led a rebellion and overthrew the Diwan. The grateful Maharaja proclaimed him the Diwan and the people enjoyed a period of justice and firm administration. But then a greater foe awaited Velu Thampi, the British East India Company, which had begun to interfere with the internal affairs of Travancore.