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Books with author Joseph Bruchac

  • Native Plant Stories

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (Fulcrum Publishing, March 1, 1995)
    These mythical stories draw upon legends from eighteen Native American tribes and illustrate the importance of plant life in Native American traditions.
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  • Native American Animal Stories

    Joseph Bruchac III

    Paperback (Fulcrum Publishing, Sept. 1, 1992)
    The Papago Indians of the American Southwest say butterflies were created to gladden the hearts of children and chase away thoughts of aging and death. How the Butterflies Came to Be is one of twenty-four Native American tales included in Native American Animal Stories. The stories, coming from Mohawk, Hopi, Yaqui, Haida and other cultures, demonstrate the power of animals in Native American traditions.Parents, teachers and children will delight in lovingly told stories about "our relations, the animals." The stories come to life through magical illustrations by Mohawk artists John Kahionhes Fadden and David Fadden."The stories in this book present some of the basic perspectives that Native North American parents, aunts and uncles use to teach the young. They are phrased in terms that modern youngsters can understand and appreciate ... They enable us to understand that while birds and animals appear to be similar in thought processes to humans, that is simply the way we represent them in our stories. But other creatures do have thought processes, emotions, personal relationships...We must carefully ccord these other creatures the respect that they deserve and the right to live without unnecessary harm. Wanton killings of different animals by some hunters and sportsmen are completely outside the traditional way that native people have treated other species, and if these stories can help develop in young people a strong sense of the wonder of other forms of life, this sharing of Native North American knowledge will certainly have been worth the effort." —excerpt from the forward by Vine Deloria, Jr.These stories first appeared in Keepers of the Animals: Native American Stories and Wildlife Activities for Children by Michael J. Caduto and Joseph Bruchac
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  • Pocahontas

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (HMH Books for Young Readers, Oct. 1, 2005)
    In 1607, when John Smith and his "Coatmen" arrive in Powhatan to begin settling the colony of Virginia, their relations with the village's inhabitants are anything but warm. Pocahontas, the beloved daughter of the Powhatan chief, Mamanatowic, is just eleven; but in spite of her age, this astute young girl acts with wisdom and compassion, and plays a fateful, peaceful role in the destinies of two peoples. Drawing from the personal journals of John Smith, Joseph Bruchac, winner of the American Book Award for Breaking Silence, reveals an important part of history through the eyes of two historic figures.
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  • My Name Is America: The Journal Of Jesse Smoke, A Cherokee Boy

    Joseph Bruchac

    Hardcover (Scholastic Inc., June 1, 2001)
    When Jesse Smoke and his family are forced to leave their home, land, and belongings, they must journey west, along with several thousand other Cherokees, on The Trail of Tears.
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  • Sacajawea

    Joseph Bruchac

    eBook (HMH Books for Young Readers, Oct. 1, 2008)
    Captured by her enemies, married to a foreigner, and a mother at age sixteen, Sacajawea lived a life of turmoil and change. Then in 1804, the mysterious young Shoshone woman known as Bird Woman met Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Acting as interpreter, peacemaker, and guide, Sacajawea bravely embarked on an epic journey that altered history forever. Hear her extraordinary story, told by Sacajawea and by William Clark, in alternating chapters and including parts of Clark's original diaries. •Authentic telling by an American Book Award winner and winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Native Writers Circle of The Americas •Includes a black-and-white map showing Lewis and Clark's trail •Told in the compelling voices of Sacajawea and William Clark—in alternating chapters—for two unique viewpoints •Sacajawea was commemorated in the year 2000 with a U.S. Treasury dollar coin bearing her likeness
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  • Two Roads

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (Puffin Books, Aug. 27, 2019)
    A boy discovers his Native American heritage in this Depression-era tale of identity and friendship by the author of Code TalkerIt's 1932, and twelve-year-old Cal Black and his Pop have been riding the rails for years after losing their farm in the Great Depression. Cal likes being a "knight of the road" with Pop, even if they're broke. But then Pop has to go to Washington, DC--some of his fellow veterans are marching for their government checks, and Pop wants to make sure he gets his due--and Cal can't go with him. So Pop tells Cal something he never knew before: Pop is actually a Creek Indian, which means Cal is too. And Pop has decided to send Cal to a government boarding school for Native Americans in Oklahoma called the Challagi School. At school, the other Creek boys quickly take Cal under their wings. Even in the harsh, miserable conditions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school, he begins to learn about his people's history and heritage. He learns their language and customs. And most of all, he learns how to find strength in a group of friends who have nothing beyond each other.
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  • Flying with the Eagle, Racing the Great Bear: Tales from Native North America

    Joseph Bruchac

    eBook (Fulcrum Publishing, June 21, 2011)
    In every American Indian culture, there comes a time in each boy's life when he must walk forth on his own, leave his home and the protection of his family to prove to himself and to his people that he can survive and grow. Traditional stories passed down from father to son were often used to offer examples of the positive qualities of manhood. Flying with the Eagle, Racing the Great Bear is a continent-spanning collection of sixteen such thrilling tales in which young men must face great enemies, find the strength and endurance within themselves to succeed, and take their place by the side of their elders.Joseph Bruchac is a traditional storyteller and writer whose work often reflects his Abenaki Indian ancestry and his lifelong interest in American Indian history and culture. Winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas and Storyteller of the Year from the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers, he is the author of more than one hundred and twenty books for children and adults.
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  • Skeleton Man

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (HarperCollins, Aug. 5, 2003)
    A chilling middle grade novel featuring a brave young girl, missing parents, and a terrifying stranger, based on a Native American legend. R.L. Stine, New York Times bestselling author of the Goosebumps series, raved, "This book gave ME nightmares!”Molly’s father, who grew up on the Mohawk Reserve of Akwesasne, always had the best scary stories. One of her favorites was the legend of Skeleton Man, a gruesome tale about a man with such insatiable hunger he ate his own flesh before devouring those around him.But ever since her parents mysteriously vanished, those spooky tales have started to feel all too real.Don't miss The Legend of Skeleton Man: a spine-tingling collection of Skeleton Man and its sequel, The Return of Skeleton Man!
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  • Killer of Enemies

    Joseph Bruchac

    eBook (Tu Books/Lee & Low Books, Oct. 7, 2013)
    Years ago, seventeen-year-old Apache hunter Lozen and her family lived in a world of havesand have-nots. There were the Ones—people so augmented with technology and geneticenhancements that they were barely human—and there was everyone else who served them. Then the Cloud came, and everything changed. Tech stopped working. The world plungedback into a new steam age. The Ones’ pets—genetically engineered monsters—turned on themand are now loose on the world. Lozen was not one of the lucky ones pre-C, but fate has given her a unique set of survivalskills and magical abilities. She hunts monsters for the Ones who survived the apocalyptic eventsof the Cloud, which ensures the safety of her kidnapped family. But with every monster she takesdown, Lozen’s powers grow, and she connects those powers to an ancient legend of her people.It soon becomes clear to Lozen that she is not just a hired gun. As the legendary Killer of Enemies was in the ancient days of the Apache people, Lozen ismeant to be a more than a hunter. Lozen is meant to be a hero.
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  • The Warriors

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (Carolrhoda Books ®, Aug. 1, 2004)
    When twelve-year-old Jake Forrest's mother gets a job in a new city, everything changes. He has to move away from the Iroquois reservation he's lived on his entire life―away from his aunt and uncle, and away from the friends he plays lacrosse with. The lacrosse coach and players at his new school in Washington, D.C., believe that winning is everything, and they don't know anything about the ways of his people. As Jake struggles to find a place where he truly belongs, tragedy strikes and he must find out who he really is. Can he find courage to face the warrior within―the warrior who values peace and leads other to more noble pursuits than outscoring the opposition?
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  • Wabi

    Joseph Bruchac

    Hardcover (Dial, April 20, 2006)
    Having been born an owl with a fearless constitution, Wabi's world takes a sudden turn when he falls in love with a human girl and, through his shape-shifting skills, transforms into a human to win her heart, yet with danger looming in the Valley of the Monsters, Wabi knows his personal desires must take second place to the perilous issues that await.
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  • On This Long Journey, the Journal of Jesse Smoke, a Cherokee Boy, the Trail of Tears, 1838

    Joseph Bruchac

    Paperback (Scholastic Paperbacks, Jan. 7, 2014)
    Critically acclaimed author Joseph Bruchac's exciting JOURNAL OF JESSE SMOKE is now in paperback with a dynamic repackaging!In 1838 in Tennessee, the Cherokee Nation is on the brink of being changed forever as they face the Removal -- being forcibly moved from their homes and land, in part because of a treaty signed by a group of their own people. Sixteen-year-old Jesse Smoke has been studying at the Mission School, but it has been shut down and turned into a fort for the ever-increasing number of soldiers entering the territory. Now Jesse has returned to his home to live with his widowed mother and two younger sisters. All hope lies on the Cherokee chief, John Ross, who is in Washington, D.C., trying to delay the Removal. Then one night, family members are suddenly awakened, dragged from their homes, and brought at gunpoint to a stockade camp. From there, Jesse and his family are forced to march westward on the horrifying Trail of Tears during the long, cold winter months. It's a difficult journey west, and Jesse's not sure if he and his family can survive the journey.
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