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Books with author Geof Smith

  • Thomas & Friends The Great Race

    Geof Smith

    Hardcover (Golden Books, July 19, 2016)
    Train-obsessed boys and girls ages 3 to 6 will enjoy this Big Golden Book retelling of the latest Thomas & Friends movie adventure, releasing in summer 2016.
    J
  • When the Cheering Stopped: The Last Years of Woodrow Wilson

    Gene Smith

    eBook (Open Road Media, Oct. 4, 2016)
    The poignant true story of an American president struck by tragedy at the height of his glory. This New York Times bestseller vividly chronicles the stunning decline in Woodrow Wilson’s fortunes after World War I and draws back the curtain on one of the strangest episodes in the history of the American presidency. Author Gene Smith brilliantly captures the drama and excitement of Wilson’s efforts at the Paris Peace Conference to forge a lasting concord between enemies, and his remarkable coast-to-coast tour to sway national opinion in favor of the League of Nations. During this grueling jaunt across 8,000 miles in less than a month, Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke that left him an invalid and a recluse, shrouding his final years in office in shadow and mystery. In graceful and dramatic prose, Smith portrays a White House mired in secrets, with a commander in chief kept behind closed doors, unseen by anyone except his doctor and his devoted second wife, Edith Galt Wilson, a woman of strong will with less than an elementary school education who, for all intents and purposes, led the government of the most powerful nation in the world for two years. When the Cheering Stopped is a gripping true story of duty, courage, and deceit, and an unforgettable portrait of a visionary leader whose valiant struggle and tragic fall changed the course of world history.
  • When the Cheering Stopped: The Last Years of Woodrow Wilson

    Gene Smith

    Hardcover (Morrow, March 15, 1964)
    The extraordinary story of Woodrow Wilson's last years in the White House and after, and the part played by his wife when the nation was without a President able to perform his duties. In the hot September of 1919, President Woodrow Wilson, his wife (the second Mrs. Wilson), his physician Dr. Cary Grayson, and his secretary Joseph Tumulty boarded the private railroad car that would carry them from Washington to California on a speaking crusade designed to persuade the American people that their country must join the League of Nations. Wilson was a man past 60, exhausted by a world war and months of wrangling over a treaty for peace. But he went among his fellow countrymen, crying aloud in a steadily hoarsening voice that unless the US embraced this League a terrible second world war would ensue. Suddenly and mysteriously the trip was cut short. Only Wilson's intimates knew that he had suffered a thrombosis and that when he returned to the White House he suffered a second attack. So begin the long 17 months when the President of the US was completely isolated from the world by his wife and his doctor. No one was allowed to see him. Senators, Cabinet officers, the Vice President, all were left in the dark, and the President's orders were scribbled in his wife's handwriting. The revelation of what actually happened in the White House during this period and what was to follow make WHEN THE CHEERING STOPPED a unique book and one that will touch the heart.
  • Lee and Grant: A Dual Biography

    Gene Smith

    eBook (Open Road Media, Oct. 4, 2016)
    A biography of the two gifted Civil War commanders from a New York Times–bestselling author: “A great story . . . History at its best” (Publishers Weekly). Their names are forever linked in the history of the Civil War, but Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant could not have been more dissimilar. Lee came from a world of Southern gentility and aristocratic privilege while Grant had coarser, more common roots in the Midwest. As a young officer trained in the classic mold, Lee graduated from West Point at the top of his class and served with distinction in the Mexican–American War. Grant’s early military career was undistinguished and marred by rumors of drunkenness. As commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Lee’s early victories demoralized the Union Army and cemented his reputation as a brilliant tactician. Meanwhile, Grant struggled mightily to reach the top of the Union command chain. His iron will eventually helped turn the tide of the war, however, and in April 1864, President Abraham Lincoln gave Grant command of all Union forces. A year later, he accepted Lee’s surrender at the Appomattox Court House. With brilliance and deep feeling, New York Times–bestselling author Gene Smith brings the Civil War era to vivid life and tells the dramatic story of two remarkable men as they rise to glory and reckon with the bitter aftermath of the bloodiest conflict in American history. Never before have students of American history been treated to a more personal, comprehensive, and achingly human portrait of Lee and Grant.
  • When the Cheering Stopped: The Last Years of Woodrow Wilson

    Gene Smith

    Paperback (Open Road Media, Feb. 6, 2018)
    The poignant true story of an American president struck by tragedy at the height of his glory. This New York Times bestseller vividly chronicles the stunning decline in Woodrow Wilson’s fortunes after World War I and draws back the curtain on one of the strangest episodes in the history of the American presidency. Author Gene Smith brilliantly captures the drama and excitement of Wilson’s efforts at the Paris Peace Conference to forge a lasting concord between enemies, and his remarkable coast-to-coast tour to sway national opinion in favor of the League of Nations. During this grueling jaunt across 8,000 miles in less than a month, Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke that left him an invalid and a recluse, shrouding his final years in office in shadow and mystery. In graceful and dramatic prose, Smith portrays a White House mired in secrets, with a commander in chief kept behind closed doors, unseen by anyone except his doctor and his devoted second wife, Edith Galt Wilson, a woman of strong will with less than an elementary school education who, for all intents and purposes, led the government of the most powerful nation in the world for two years. When the Cheering Stopped is a gripping true story of duty, courage, and deceit, and an unforgettable portrait of a visionary leader whose valiant struggle and tragic fall changed the course of world history.
  • Burning Crowe: a Red Hot Bite of Best British Noir

    Geoff Smith

    eBook (Burning Gun Books, June 7, 2019)
    Two teenagers, both alike in indignity. Will they be civil? Or will there be blood?Bartholomew Crowe is 18 years old. His dad dead, and deserted by his stepmother, he's running seriously low on justice. And when he is hired to find a rich kid gone AWOL, it isn't just a job; it's a chance to do good, a chance to fix things up, to make things right.Handsome and loaded, Zack Richards has it all. A beautiful girlfriend. A burgeoning sideline in music management. Hell, he's even semi-famous! But for all his good fortune, Zack Richards is angry. He's addicted to trouble. And he's gone into hiding.But Bart isn't the only one with Zack in his sights. And as tensions rise and bullets fly, Bartholomew Crowe learns that the only things he can count on are friendship, and love.
  • Above 95th Street and Other Basketball Stories

    Geof Smith

    Paperback (Lowell House, Oct. 1, 1997)
    An assortment of short stories focusing on young people and basketball
    T
  • Lee and Grant: A Dual Biography

    Gene Smith

    Paperback (Open Road Media, Aug. 29, 2017)
    A biography of the two gifted Civil War commanders from a New York Times–bestselling author: “A great story . . . History at its best” (Publishers Weekly). Their names are forever linked in the history of the Civil War, but Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant could not have been more dissimilar. Lee came from a world of Southern gentility and aristocratic privilege while Grant had coarser, more common roots in the Midwest. As a young officer trained in the classic mold, Lee graduated from West Point at the top of his class and served with distinction in the Mexican–American War. Grant’s early military career was undistinguished and marred by rumors of drunkenness. As commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Lee’s early victories demoralized the Union Army and cemented his reputation as a brilliant tactician. Meanwhile, Grant struggled mightily to reach the top of the Union command chain. His iron will eventually helped turn the tide of the war, however, and in April 1864, President Abraham Lincoln gave Grant command of all Union forces. A year later, he accepted Lee’s surrender at the Appomattox Court House. With brilliance and deep feeling, New York Times–bestselling author Gene Smith brings the Civil War era to vivid life and tells the dramatic story of two remarkable men as they rise to glory and reckon with the bitter aftermath of the bloodiest conflict in American history. Never before have students of American history been treated to a more personal, comprehensive, and achingly human portrait of Lee and Grant.
  • Lee and Grant: A Dual Biography

    Gene Smith

    Hardcover (McGraw-Hill, May 1, 1984)
    A dual portrait of the two Civil War leaders interweaves the lives of U.S. Grant and Robert E. Lee with the momentous historical events of the mid-nineteenth century in America
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Krabby

    Geoff Smith

    Paperback (Golden Books, July 1, 2001)
    None
    C
  • Bayou Boy

    George Smith

    Paperback (iUniverse, Sept. 15, 2000)
    Jean LeBlanc had lived in the Louisiana swamp country all his fourteen years. He loved the swamp, just as his father did. Jean had never gone to school, and neither had his father, but Papa taught him what a man needed to know in order to live in the swamp. Jean could shoot alligators, trap muskrats, and catch fish almost as well as any grown man in the bayou.But things were changing. Big caterpillar tractors were shoving up the black earth and filling the swampland with noise and blue diesel smoke. The state of Louisiana was building a road through the swamp, and the animals were moving farther into the wilds. A man couldn't make a living by hunting and trapping. Papa had to go to work on the offshore oil rigs out in the Gulf of Mexico, and Jean had to look after his mother and sister while Papa was gone.Taking his father's place proved to be more difficult and dangerous than Jean had imagined. But it was a maturing experience, and it helped Jean to accept the fact that nothing stays the same. Both he and Papa had come to realize that the old way of life was gone, and that for Jean, the new life must include school.
    Y
  • When the cheering stopped: The last years of Woodrow Wilson

    Gene Smith

    Mass Market Paperback (Bantam, March 15, 1965)
    Vintage paperback